Isaac Stull Swearingen Oregon Pioneer dies 1884

masonic“Obituary.

Isaac Stull Swearingen, was born Sept 2, 1812 in Kentucky; about 1830 he moved to Vermillion county, Illinois.  He was married Nov 22, 1848, to Miss Evaline Boyd, and lived to have had ten children, five of whom are living.

Mr. Swearingen became a member of the I O O F before his marriage, and remained an active member throughout life, being a charter member of three lodges in this state.

He became a member of the AF & AM* in 1852, and was one of the three living charter members of Eugene City Lodge, and also a charter member in Junction City.  He had joined with the Cumberland Presbyterian Church before leaving Illinois, and lived a consistent member thereof.

In 1852 he removed to Oregon and first settled near Spore’s Ferry.  An affectionate and loving husband and father, a tried and true friend, an openhearted and philanthropic citizen, his loss will be sincerely mourned far and near for his acquaintance was extensive.”  Eugene City Guard, Jan 19, 1884, pg. 3, col. 4.

Cemetery records claim he was born on September 12, 1812.  Find-a-grave list his wife and accompanying obituary as Evaline Buoy Swearingen rather than Boyd.  She too is listed as buried at the Masonic Cemetery in Eugene Oregon, but cemetery records list her as Emiline Buoy Carter.  The Find-a-grave posting shows her under Evaline Buoy Carter, the obituary posted gives no reference to a Mr. Carter. Given that  Mr. Swearingen died in 1884 and she did not die for another 25 years, I assume she remarried.

This is a good example of why newspaper obituaries are considered secondary sources. While there are many discrepancies noted – if this is all you had to begin your search it offers many important clues to contribute to your research.

*Ancient Free & Accepted Masons

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About gtoftdahl

Researching in Oregon Newspapers
This entry was posted in Death dates, Eugene History, Eugene Masonic Cemetery, Featured Obituary, Lane County Oregon History, Oregon History, Oregon Pioneers and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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