G.E. Benedict Discharged from the Service in 1898

 

Edwin E Benedict house on Cox Island East of FLorence Oregon

Edwin E Benedict house on Cox Island East of FLorence Oregon

“Insane.

G.E. Benedict, one of the recruits from this city to answer to the last call for volunteers, and who has been stationed at San Francisco awaiting transportation to Manila, has been declared insane and discharged from service.  The young man is a son of Mr. and Mrs. E.E. Benedict of Florence, and attended the state university last winter.  Mr. Benedict arrived from Florence Saturday and left the same evening for San Francisco and will bring his son home.

A correspondent writer to the Roseburg Review concerning the case says:  I am sorry to say that one of our comrades in Co. L. by the name of Benedict from Eugene is insane.  It seems he had never been away from home much until he came down here, and as a result he became homesick.  Also being a “green horn” among strangers, the boys teased him considerably.  But the impression being so strong on his mind his mental faculties soon became deranged.  Nothing has been done so far except to put him under a special guard who watches him day and night.”  Oregon State Journal (Eugene Oregon)  August 6, 1898, pg. 5, col. 4  University of Oregon Knight Library, Newspaper Collection.

The Benedict House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  Located on the Siuslaw River just east of Florence Oregon, the house is now in a state of deterioration.  The house is said to have been the inspiration behind the Stamper House in Ken Kesey’s novel Sometimes a Great Notion.

Glenn Ellis Benedict was the son of E.E. (Edwin) & Sophia A. Benedict was born in April 1876 in Michigan (1900 Census) and died May 25, 1906 at the age of 30.  He is buried at the Pacific Sunset Memorial Park Cemetery in Florence Oregon.

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About gtoftdahl

Researching in Oregon Newspapers
This entry was posted in Lane County Oregon History, Oregon History and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to G.E. Benedict Discharged from the Service in 1898

  1. Jonathan Guske says:

    As a 7th generation Oregonian I have lived all my life watching the E.E. Benedict home sink into the Siuslaw River. My sister & I would play I spy on trips to the Oregon coast driving Route F, or what is commonly known now as hwy.126 In the 1970’s when we were young it was still a rather regal looking Saltbox house anchored to the river bank, spooky & fascinating! I’m glad I have a treasure trove of pictures all from over the last 40 years. Mel Vincent did a wonderful painting of it in 1974 which I still have today.

  2. gtoftdahl says:

    A 7th generation Oregonian, that is very impressive. Thanks Jonathan for sharing your comment! Greg

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