Lane County’s 1901 Cherry Crop being shipped to California

“Fruit Being Shipped.

Shortage of over 3,000 cases.

Lane County’s Cherry Crop En Route to California by the Carload.

Last Thursday evening the Eugene Canning and Packing Company closed their run on the season’s cherry crop, and the “fruits” of their labor are 3,450 cases of Royal Anne cherries, which are being shipped to California, where the cans will be labeled “Prepared by Hund Bros. Co. Haywards, Cal.”

The first carload of the fruit was shipped Monday, two cars were shipped last night, and today the remaining two carloads will be shipped, making a total of five carloads of Oregon cherries from this point alone that will go to swell California’s horticultural statistics.

E E Morford, of the firm of Hund Bros. Company, who has been in this city superintending the operations at the cannery, informed a Register reporter yesterday that during his experience of 14 years in the fruity business he ad never handled a more choice crop of cherries than those produced in lane county this season.  Mr. Morford estimates that owing to the frost and the continued cold weather of last spring when the fruit was developing, the season’s crop has fallen short at least 3,000 cases in Lane county.”

Mr. Allen of the cannery, has gone to Salem to investigate the pear crop between that city and Eugene, and in case he finds the fruit in paying quantities will contract for the crop, which will be ready to handle by the middle of August, and pack it for the Hayward’s company.”  Eugene Morning Register, July 24, 1901, pg. 4, col. 3, University of Oregon, Knight Library’s Newspaper Collection.

This is another example of how Lane County has changed over the years.  Many of the old orchards are gone.  Historical Lane County was once home to huge prune orchards and commerical dryers to process their fruit.  Other crops that were grown were hops and even flax. 

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About gtoftdahl

Researching in Oregon Newspapers
This entry was posted in Lane County Oregon History, Oregon History and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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